Dive Into the Wordpool

I discovered wordpools in Susan Goldsmith Wooldridge’s Poemcrazy. “I collect…hats, coins, cougars, old Studebakers,” she writes. “That is, I collect the words. Pith helmet, fragment, Frigidaire, quarrel, love seat, lily. I call gathering words this way creating a wordpool. This process helps free us to follow the words and write poems.” When I read this, I’d been writing Continue reading Dive Into the Wordpool

Chop Wood, Carry Water: Publishing a First Poetry Book After Fifty

I asked writers who’d published their first books of poetry at or beyond the age of fifty to discuss their experiences. Was there any particular reason they’d waited to publish? Did they think there was an advantage to publishing later in life? How had publishing a first book changed their lives? The responses from over Continue reading Chop Wood, Carry Water: Publishing a First Poetry Book After Fifty

The Making of a Winning Poem: Writing “The State of Jefferson”

More than two years ago, I started tinkering with a poem about my long drives up and down Interstate Highway 5, drives that began when I was a child and continued, with regularity, until the present day.  My first note was an entry in my journal, dated December 15, 2017: “I cross the border going Continue reading The Making of a Winning Poem: Writing “The State of Jefferson”

STONE empty chair’s first review

I’m happy to share that my haiku collection, STONE empty chair, has received its first review! I self-published it late last year, and had an enjoyable time selecting the poems, designing the book, and then, of course, receiving the box of copies. I’m also grateful to Serena Agusto-Cox, who runs Savvy Verse & Wit, a Continue reading STONE empty chair’s first review